Animal rescue site for people who need to catch llamas & alpacas

This site gives those who need to catch llamas the tools to do so. It will also tell you how to find locals who can help with animal rescue.  


  LLAMAS ARE NOT DANGEROUS AND IF YOU SHOULD GET SPIT ON, IT WILL NOT HURT. THE MAIN THING TO REMEMBER WHEN TRYING TO CATCH LLAMAS IS TO GO SLOW, QUIETLY & KEEP THEM TOGETHER AS A GROUP. (SEE ATTACHED ARTICLES.)  


 Before  attempting to catch a llama or alpaca please contact someone on our list. Try a local large animal rescue or a veterinarian. Often they can recommend a farm with  llamas/alpacas who would be willing to help. Maybe they even know of a local llama shearer who has worked extensively with the species. 

How to Catch A Llama or alpaca

This site is designed to help animal rescue personnel when they have to rescue llamas or alpacas.

This site includes basic handling and care but also has contact information on people who can help or may know someone in your immediate area that will be an animal rescue resource. 

 

Both llamas and alpacas can be handled in pretty much the same way. Because of their smaller size, alpaca fencing has to have smaller openings. 

 

First Some Basics: Llamas and alpacas are not dangerous animals. They do not normally charge you or try to fight. They try to avoid being handled & will fight to get away but will not normally be aggressive. If you do come in contact with an aggressive animal (Extremely rare.) see the attached photos on "Berserk Males". 

 

Llamas are a bit peculiar. They have a large personal space and don't like people or other llamas to get too close. They absolutely hate to have their faces touched. They also have an aversion to having their legs touched. In fact they really don't like to be touched at all so don't use petting as a means to calm them down. It may do just the opposite.   

 

l spit. It is one of the few ways they have to protect themselves. If you handle them quietly in a non threatening way you can catch them, load them in a trailer and be on your way without seeing a drop of spit. Some traumatized animals will spit but they usually give a warning. They hold their nose up, give a loud scream or a throat gurgle. This is llama speak for "back off'. If you step back, they probably won't spit. Spit is simply chewed up food. It may smell but it won't hurt you. It is not stomach acid.

 

Most llamas don't kick. It's more of an alpaca thing. They don't have hooves, just soft pads like the foot of a dog. So even if you do get kicked it is not a major issue. 

 

Llamas that are not shorn and are in 90 plus degree heat are in danger of heat stress. Once they get down and can't get up they will die. It takes specialized veterinarian care to save them and often they still die. If you are rescuing llamas in the heat & humidity, try and do it in the coolest part of the day. 

 

Go to the page on "How to do it" for various articles and tips on how to control and catch llamas and alpacas. The Resource page lists people and organizations where more help can be obtained. The Rescue organizations will help you place these animals in safe homes. 


Sometimes all you need to catch a llama is a bowl of grain.

Sometimes all you need to catch a llama is a bowl of grain.

Below are links to information you will need.

How to do it.

Articles and links to videos on how to actually catch llamas and alpacas.

Articles on how to catch llamas, what to feed, how to handle without injury & related information about animal rescue.

Find out more

Resources

Contacts: People who can help.

Contact numbers: people who can answer questions or help with the actual rescue. Local llama organizations and animal rescue sites that may have people who can help.

Find out more

Photo articles

List of rescue organizations

Photos showing  things that will

 make your animal rescue easier.

Find out more

Sponsored by: International Lama Registry

image3
image4